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Central Serous Retinopathy

What is Central Serous Chorioretinopathy?

Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC) is a condition in which fluid accumulates under the retina, causing a serous (fluid-filled) detachment and vision loss. Depending on the location and amount of subretinal fluid, CSC may be associated with blurry vision. If the affected are falls outside of the macula, CSC can show no symptoms.

Although the causes of CSC are not fully understood, it may be induced by systemic exposure to corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are found in allergy nose sprays and anti-inflammatory skin creams available over the counter, and are often prescribed to treat a variety of medical conditions. Other drugs such as stimulants, decongestants, erectile dysfunction medications, and some anti-cancer agents may trigger CSC

Patients with high blood pressure or heart disease and those with a current or recent pregnancy have been shown to have a higher risk of developing CSC.

CSC may resolve within a few weeks to months without treatment. If you have chronic CSC, there are several therapeutic options such as laser treatments and eye injections that may be effective in treating the fluid leakage in CSC.

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